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How Do You Translate The Phrase 'You're Welcome' Into French, Italian, German And Spanish?

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Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered

The phrase, 'you're welcome' would need changing to 'you are welcome' to get a clear translation into another language. In French it translates as, 'vous étes bienvenus'. In Italian it would be, 'sei benvenuto'. In German it would be, 'Sie sind herzlich eingeladen'. Finally in Spanish it would become, 'Seré bienvenido'.

A warm welcome in different languages

In French the phrase is often more than just a simple, 'you are welcome', it goes further to mean, 'warmly welcome' or 'very welcome'. The Italian word, 'benvenuto', could also mean 'received with pleasure'. The German phrase could also mean, 'you are warmly invited', 'we encourage you' or 'we invite you to'. These all depend on the context the phrase is used in.

If the phrase is used by itself then it would have the simple meaning of, 'you are welcome'.

In the German it is a strong welcome so it would be, 'very welcome'. The Spanish would sometimes translate as, 'eres bienvenido'. Although, this would more commonly mean just, 'welcome', it is likely that it would be used more frequently.

The origin behind the French, German, Italian & Spanish ways of saying "you're welcome"

In the French, Italian and Spanish the word for, 'welcome', is very similar. In French it is, 'bienvenu', in Italian, 'benvenuto', and Spanish, 'bienvenido'. The correlation can be seen clearly between these words. It is thought that the origin comes from the Germanic, willkommen, which means, 'welcome'. Often it would be assumed that the word comes from Latin as a lot of languages find their origins from this language.

Akshay Kalbag Profile
Akshay Kalbag answered
If you want to translate the phrase you are welcome into French, you would use the expressions je t'en prie (if the addressee is the same age as you or younger in age than are) and je vous en prie (if the addressee is older in age than you are or is in a higher position than you are in). Avec plaisir and the phrases pas de quoi and de rien are also used in French to say you are welcome.

If you want to translate the phrase you are welcome into French, you would use the expression Prego. If you want to translate the phrase you are welcome into German, you would use the expression Bitte schon (this is used in response to the expression Danke schon, which means Thank you in German). If you want to translate the phrase you are welcome into Spanish, you would use the expression de nada (this is used in response to the expression Gracias, which means Thank you in Spanish).
Shujing Profile
Shujing answered
The French have many ways of saying “you’re welcome,” so which phrase you’ll use will depend on who you are and with whom you’re speaking.

In casual conversation with a close friend, you might say “de rien,” or literally, “it’s nothing.”  In a more formal situation, you might say “je vous en prie.”  “Il n’y a pas de quoi” is another phrase you’ll hear, typically between two people who already know each other.  

If you’re in Italy, “prego,” pronounced “preh-goh” is used in situations both formal and casual.  

German speakers use the phrase “bitte schön” for “you’re welcome.”   However, it is important that “bitte” may also be used to mean “please” or “sorry,” depending on the context in which it is used.

The Spanish phrase for “you’re welcome” is “de nada,” which, much like one of the French phrases, literally means “it’s nothing.”  

Knowing polite phrases for countries where you plan to travel will make your voyages much more pleasant, and maybe even open a few social doors for you.

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Being able to communicate in another language is brilliant and it is always best to start with small phrases such as hello, goodbye and "you're welcome"

In FRENCH: "you're welcome" can be said in 2 different ways:
1) De Rien (deh - ree-en) with the "r" sound being made at the back of your throat.
This can be roughly translated as - it's nothing; or don't mention it.
OR
2) Avec plaisir (ah-vek + pleh-zeer) which roughly translates as: my pleasure.

In ITALIAN, "you're welcome" is:
'Prego' - pronounced Pray-goh.

In GERMAN you can say:
1) Bitte shoen (Bit-teh + shern)

In Spanish:
1) De nada (day-nah-dah) can be used. Translating 'it's nothing'

Hope this helps!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I studied French, German and Spanish at school and my mum did Italian. Here is what I think 'you're welcome' is in these languages:

In FRENCH: "you're welcome" can be said in 2 different ways:

1) De Rien (deh - ree-en) with the "r" sound being made at the back of your throat.
This can be roughly translated as - it's nothing; or don't mention it.
OR
2) Avec plaisir (ah-vek + pleh-zeer) which roughly translates as: my pleasure.

In ITALIAN, "you're welcome" is:
'Prego' - pronounced Pray-goh.

In GERMAN you can say:
1) Bitte shoen (Bit-teh + shern)

In Spanish:
1) De nada (day-nah-dah) can be used.
Translating as 'it's nothing'.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I'm french, and the best translation for "you're welcome" is :

1 - "De rien" -> "its nothing"
2 - "Il n'y a pas de quoi" -> "There is no what"
3 - "À votre service" "(I'm) at your service"
Matt Bramowicz Profile
Matt Bramowicz answered

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Kieran R. Profile
Kieran R. answered

In German you would usually say "bitteschön", or just "bitte". Also "Kein Problem" can be said if you want to say "No problem".

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
For Italian there's also:
"Non c'è che" (non che ke) which roughly translates to "Don't worry about it"
"Nessun Problema" (nes-soon prob-lame-ah) which means "No problem".

For German you can also say:
"Kein Problem" (Kine prob-lame)

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