What's Social Stratification On The Basis Of Conflict Theory, Functionalist Theory And Symbolic Interaction?

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Jen Profile
Jen answered
Conflict theory begins with three assumptions, two of which are of importance for understanding stratification: 1) society is comprised of different sub-groups and each group shares different norms, values, and beliefs; and 2) groups in society are in fierce competition for limited resources.  Conflict theorists argue that conflict among groups will arise and, in fact, it is inevitable.  The "haves" (i.e., those with social, economic, and political power) actively work to maintain the present social order in which the "have nots" have either very limited or no access to precious resources (i.e., good jobs, houses, networks, etc.).

In contrast, functionalists believe that all parts of society (and its members) work together to perpetuate existing social relations.  By this perspective, society is likened to a machine - all parts function together to keep it running smoothly.  Functionalists argue that stratification is normal and inevitable, and it functions to maintain stability in a given society. 

Symbolic interactionism emphasizes processes by which individuals learn to behave as functional members of a society, and places great emphasis on the meanings we attribute to behavior (including our own and the behavior of others).  Symbolic interactionism isn't employed to study stratification as often as conflict and functional perspectives.  However, studies that employ this perspective would may focus on topics such as how inequality is reproduced in interactions or how language can be used to reproduce inequality.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
A class stratification system is based on
1)  your varna
2)  your obligation to your employees or employer
3)  your parent's economic position
4)  your achieved economic position

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