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What Are Double-barreled Questions?

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Yun Wan Profile
Yun Wan answered
A double barrelled question is when you put together two ambiguous questions which do in fact sound like one question. For example, one question that lends itself to different possible answers to its subparts is called a double barrelled press. The notion of this double barrelled theme means that the question could bring a 'yes' response to the first part and a 'no' response to the latter part.
In this instance it would probably be better to ask two questions; ie: "Do you think there is an honest market for the product, and do you think the product will sell powerfully?"
The answers in this situation may be 'yes' to the second and 'no' to the first, 'yes' to the first and 'no' to the second. If we decided to combine the two questions and asked a double barrelled question we may confuse the respondents which may result in uncertain answers. So, double barrelled questions should be eliminated if possible.
An example of another double barrelled question is "to what extent would you say you are happy?" Respondents might find it difficult to decide whether the response is directed to the workplace, general wellbeing, career or all of the above.
Nouman Umar Profile
Nouman Umar answered
A question that lends itself to different possible response to its subparts is called a double barrelled question. Such questions should be avoided and two or more separate questions asked instead. For example the question "Do you think there is a good market for the product and that it will sell well? could bring a yes response to the first part and a no response to the latter part.

In this case it would be better to ask two questions do you think there is a good market for the product and do you think the product will sell well? The answers may be yes to the second and No to the both, yes to the first and no to the second or yes to the second and no to the first. If we combined the two questions and asked a double barrelled question we would confuse the respondents and obtain ambiguous responses. Hence double barrelled questions should be eliminated.

Even questions that are not double barrelled might be ambiguously worded and respondent may not be sure what exactly they mean. An example of such question is " to what extent would you say you are happy". Respondents might find it difficult to decide whether the question refers to their state of feelings at the workplace.

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